Showing 461 results

Archival description
University of British Columbia Library Okanagan Special Collections
Print preview Hierarchy View:

Simpson Family fonds

  • CA OSC-ARC-02
  • Fonds
  • 1906-2009, predominant 1920-1979

The fonds consists of two separate streams of documentation. The first consists of documents, photographs, and artifacts pertaining to the operations of a succession of sawmills and wood manufacturing plants founded by Stanley Merriam Simpson) and assumed by his son, Horace B. Simpson in the Okanagan area.
The second stream consists of the materials generated by Sharron J. Simpson, a Kelowna author, publisher, and activist. Sharron J. Simpson's records within this aggregation are primarily in relation to legal proceedings against the City of Kelowna in pursuit of the maintenance of the Simpson Covenant, which limits use of waterfront land on a former mill site sold by S.M. Simpson to the City under restrictive terms of sale in 1946. In the 2000s, the City sought to dissolve the Covenant; Sharron J. Simpson founded a society to challenge this initiative.
In total fonds consists of approximately 2,642 photographs, in various forms, including some duplicates. Records provide documentation of legal proceedings, finances, substantial mill operations, safety initiatives, administration, civic engagement, publicity, and labour relations relating to mill business, general family research, and writing samples. Artifacts include exemplars of production and souvenir materials.

S.M. Simpson Ltd. sous fonds

Administrative history
The Simpson family fonds is primarily a compilation of the images and records of three corporate entities, (Kelowna Sawmill Ltd., S.M. Simpson Ltd., S & K Ltd.) as well as the records and images of S. M. Simpson’s sole proprietorship between 1913 – 1924, prior to the incorporation of S. M. Simpson Ltd.

The Kelowna Sawmill dates from 1892 when it was first established by Bernard Lequime, who subsequently sold it to David Lloyd-Jones in 1901. Lloyd-Jones had a variety of business partners during the time he owned the sawmill. In 1942, Stanley M. Simpson, the owner of S. M. Simpson Ltd., purchased and operated the Kelowna Sawmill until it was destroyed by fire in 1944. The corporate Kelowna Sawmill Ltd. was maintained and became the retail arm of S. M. Simpson Ltd. until 1956, when retail operations ceased.
Stanley M. Simpson arrived in Kelowna in 1913 and operated a sole proprietorship for the next eleven years (1913-1924) until incorporating S. M. Simpson Ltd. in 1924. During those early years, Simpson operated his business in two different downtown locations, as well as running, or partnering in various portable sawmills throughout the area. His sash and door factory on Abbott Street, manufactured and sold windows and doors, custom furniture, and wooden fruit boxes for the expanding Okanagan fruit and vegetable industry. The business operated out of this location until 1948.
Needing a reliable and accessible source of logs, Stanley Simpson bought land at Manhattan Beach along the lakeshore, in Kelowna’s North End. In 1930, he began constructing a sawmill and box factory and three years later, added a veneer plant to the site.

The Province of British Columbia created Forest Management licenses in 1951, when S. M. Simpson Ltd. was awarded Tree Farm License #9. Needing to diversity, S. M. Simpson Ltd. created S&K Ltd. to add a plywood manufacturing facility to the Manhattan site. It began operations in 1957.

In the following years S. M. Simpson Ltd. purchased other sawmills and logging operations, including Trautman Garraway in Peachland (1955), Peachland Sawmill & Box (1955), McLean Sawmills (1957), Lumby Timber Co (1959), Ferguson Brothers Lumber (1962), Stave Lumber (1962) Eagle Pass Lumber (1963), R&L Lumber (1964).
Stanley Simpson died in 1959. Horace B. Simpson, Stanley’s son, managed S. M. Simpson Ltd. until 1965 when the company was sold to Crown Zellerbach, Canada. A branch operation of the U.S. company, this was the first of a succession of owners, and though the Simpson name was attached to the operations for several years, the family was no longer involved.

In 1965, H.B. Simpson sold S.M.S. Ltd and its several associates and subsidiaries to the Canadian instance of Crown Zellerbach Corporation: Crown Zellerbach Canada. It continued operating as the S.M. Simpson Division of Crown Zellerbach Canada for several years until the name was changed to simply Crown Zellerbach Canada. In 1969, Crown Zellerbach purchased several more sawmills in the region, including Armstrong Sawmills operations in Armstrong, Enderby, Vernon and Falkland, as well as Ponderosa Pine Lumber Co. in 1970.

In 1981 Crown Zellerbach Canada was purchased by Fletcher Challenge Canada Ltd. and the entity’s name was changed to Crown Forest, and in 1987 the name changed again to Fletcher Challenge Canada Ltd. The company was then subsequently purchased by Riverside Forest Products in 1992. In 2004 Riverside Forest Products was purchased by Tolko Industries Ltd. which operated until 2020.

Scope and content
The sous fonds includes records generated by Stanley Merriam Simpson both before and after the corporate life of S.M. Simpson Ltd., and additionally documents a suite of succeeding companies that assumed the business operations and assets established by S.M. Simpson.

The sous fonds consists of a photographic record that documents the wood processing entity established by S.M. Simpson across iterations of corporate ownership, as well as business records relating to substantial operations, labour relations, safety programs, legal proceedings, and administration.

The sous fonds consists of a photographic record that documents the wood processing entity established by S.M. Simpson across iterations of corporate ownership, as well as business records relating to substantial operations, labour relations, safety programs, legal proceedings, and administration.

1910s – 1930s Early Days.

File consists of early photographs of precursors to S.M. Simpson, Ltd., predominantly ca. 1910 - 1939, with occasional outliers dating as recently as the 1950s. Featured in this collection are depictions of The Kelowna Sawmill (KSM), which was moved to the Lakeshore site from Okanagan Mission about 1892, and owned by various historic figures local to Kelowna. KSM burned down several times, and was eventually sold to S.M. Simpson in 1942. Much of the mill burned to the ground in 1944, and while the land was still owned by KSM, the company was owned by S.M. Simpson. Many of the photos in the collection date from those early years. Additionally, there are numerous photos of portable sawmills that were located in Ellison and Winfield, but which didn't form part of S.M. Simpson Ltd., although they were often owned solely, or in partnership, by S.M. Simpson.

Lumb Stocks collection

Biographical sketch:
Lumb Stocks (b. 1887 in Leicester, England, d. 1947 in Penticton, BC) immigrated to Kelowna in 1910. He traveled back in England in 1915 to marry his wife, Marion. Together they had five children: Peter, Beryl, Jack, Daphne, and David.

In Vernon, Stocks purchased a camera from G.H.E. “Huddy” Hudson. Soon Stocks was offered a job by Hudson and he joined his photography studio. He became a partner and took over operations of the firm in 1916 when Hudson returned to England during WWI, renaming the enterprise “Hudson-Stocks & Co.” After deciding to stay permanently in England, Hudson asked Stocks in 1918 to buy out his partnership. Instead Stocks made a purchase from Hudson and his Penticton partner, Ken Chadwick, for the photography firm there and moved his family to the Penticton area.

Lumb Stocks’ second son, Jack Stocks, took over the business upon his father’s death in 1947, and maintained the Stocks Photography until his own untimely death in 1979.

Scope and content:
Subseries consists of photographic record captured by Lumb Stocks and/or Jack Stocks and/or on behalf of Stocks Camera Shop, Penticton BC. These are commercial, professional photographs and the collection features an insignificant number of portraits or candid shots. The majority of the photographs were created during the lifetime of Lumb Stocks, and a minority by Jack Stocks, his successor.

Subseries documents landscapes, city scenes, events, disasters, buildings, and landmarks associated with Penticton, BC, primarily during the first half of the twentieth century.

Suite of postcards features a small subset of hand-tinted examples.

Penticton Herald photograph collection

Subseries consists of an acquisition by Doug Cox of a collection of photographic negatives from the newspaper The Penticton Herald.

Coverage includes themes such as the cultural events, sports, rodeo, telecommunications, buildings and community infrastructure, aviation, industry, disasters.

Penticton area research collection

Subseries consists of a photographic and oral history record of Penticton civic life from approximately 1910 through the mid 1970s, with predominant coverage during the middle decades of the twentieth century. Materials relate to sports, cultural events, landmarks and buildings, industry, transportation & infrastructure, and agriculture. Many of the photographs can likely be attributed to the Penticton Herald.

Results 1 to 50 of 461