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Archival description
Doug and Joyce Cox Research Collection
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Apex Mountain collection

Subseries consists of a collection of documents covering the inception and development of Apex Mountain Resort near Penticton, BC. Includes form letters to Apex members, reports, and some financial statements. Also included is a collection of promotional brochures from the 1970s – 1990s

An additional sequence of photographs related to Apex Mountain can also be found in series 1.3-1 (Historical Photograph Collection) at the item range 1.3-1/00766 – 1.3-1/00813.

Archibald Murchie collection

Biographical sketch:
Archibald Murchie (1852-1930) immigrated to Victoria, BC as an adult. His brother, Thomas Murchie would go on to found Murchie’s Tea and name his own son Archibald Murchie (1892-1925, and not to be confused with his namesake). Following his calling to become an evangelist minister for the Spiritualist Church (an off-shoot of the Church of England), he set off into the interior of BC to preach as a missionary.

Although Murchie had dabbled in photography prior to coming to Canada, his career began in earnest when he arrived in Williams Lake, BC, in 1893. Wherever his missionary calling took him, Murchie brought along his camera. Marcus Smith, famed CPR engineer and previous associate of Murchie’s by function of their common membership to the Spiritualist Church, hired Murchie to photograph the creation of a bridge over the Fraser River at Sheep Creek. Work on this project was slow enough to afford Murchie to engage in side trips to Quenel, BC, and farther north. Here he made a connection with the Reverend A. H. Cameron who suggested he establish a parish in Princeton. After this failed, Murchie returned to the Cariboo and set up a photography studio in Ashcroft, BC.

In 1911 Murchie moved again to the Okanagan Valley and in 1916 at age 64 he married Amy Wood. His last attributed photograph was taken in 1918.

Scope and content:
Landscapes showing developing infrastructure in the interior of British Columbia in the later 19th and early 20th century, with especially robust coverage of the construction of railroads and bridges, as well as some mining operations. Features group portraits of work crews.

Brent family collection

Biographical sketch:
Alexander Theodore “Sandy” Brent (1912-1990) was as lifelong resident of the South Okanagan. After the death of his mother in the influenza epidemic of 1918, he and his siblings (Frederick (Eddie), Mary, Alice, Margaret and Donald) were raised by his grandparents at the Shingle Creek Ranch. Brent married Harriet Morgan and together they raised two sons (Kenneth (b. 1942) and George (b. 1945). His sister Alice married Hal Tweddle; she and her family is photographically documented in the Richter and Tweddle families collection.

The Brents lived variously in Allen Grove, St. Andrews by the Lake, and Penticton. Sandy Brent worked in ranching, hard rock mining (Nickel Plate mine above Hedley), logging, and finally as a foreman and later superintendent for the Hatfield family’s Interior Contracting Company.

Scope and content:
Subseries consists of recorded interview and transcripts of recorded interviews. Not all audio recordings associated with transcripts are extant; likewise not all audio tapes have an associated recording. Content of interviews includes personal reminiscences, descriptions of photographs, and family histories. Subseries also includes a suite of interviews with his sisters, Margaret, Alice, and Margaret.

Doug and Joyce Cox Research Collection

  • CA OSC ARC 01
  • Collection
  • 1865-2008, predominant 1900-1999

Collection consists of the documentation of Cox’s career as an historian and author. The collection is comprised predominantly of photographic material. There are approximately 15,000 unique photographic images: prints in various standard dimensions (8"x10", 5"x7", 4"x6" and smaller, with some custom dimensions, predominantly in black and white; slide transparencies in black and white and colour; negatives, (120, 35mm, and 4”x5”) in black and white; digital photographs in black and white and colour contained on CDs and one hard drive.

Photographic coverage extends from the 1870s to approximately 2008, with the period 1900-1970s predominant. Original photographs by Doug Cox cover the 1970s through approximately 2008.

The collection also features audio cassettes containing sound recordings of interviews recorded in the 1980s and 1990s with associated transcriptions by Joyce Cox. Government documents (primarily Province of British Columbia, c. 1910-1960s) include topographical maps, tree farm license maps, mineral claims maps, taxation records, forestry examination sketches and other records.

Geography covered is predominantly the Shuswap, Okanagan, Similkameen, Boundary, Kootenay, Nicola and Thompson regions of British Columbia, with sparser coverage of outlying areas as well.

Themes treated include mining, ranching, forestry, agriculture and orchard cultivation, industry and infrastructure, landscapes and cityscapes, sports and recreation, community life, and family documentation.

Doug Cox manuscripts and publications

The series consists of textual works by Doug Cox, occasionally edited by Joyce Cox. Includes curricular materials developed for the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation, short compositions, historical drafts, biographical drafts, proofs for works destined for publication, and materials prepared as a regular column for the Western Producer. Includes 6 scrapbooks of clippings from the Western News Advertiser covering a recurring column contributed by Doug Cox.

Doug Cox photography and videography

Series consists of original still and moving photography attributed to Doug Cox from the 1970s through to 2008 in support of his career as author and historian Frequently, Cox’s images form a time-lapse continuation of the older photographs he collected for research purposes. There are many reprisals of people, buildings, landscapes, and subjects first treated in his acquired collections. In addition to this, Cox documents many of his interview subjects photographically, and this series in large part complements his corpus of recorded interviews/oral histories and collected manuscripts.

Notable are objects of documentation are locations, specifically Penticton, Blakeburn, and Coalmont, and themes, specifically ranching, mining, and rodeo.

The VHS tapes include recordings of Penticton infrastructure such as the sanitary landfill, water purification plant, recycling depot, as well as the closure of Nickel Plate Mine’s last day of operation in 1996.

The contents of the La Cie hard drive have not yet been reviewed. Physical photographs have been separated, or are in the process of being separated.

Doug Cox research materials

Series consists of Doug Cox’s collecting activity carried out in support of his writing. Points of origin are from various interior regions of British Columbia. Collections acquired are predominantly composed of photographic material, secondarily of textual material, with thematically compiled interviews and associated transcripts also included. Contents depict, describe, and comment upon a variety of scenes and settings, primarily concerning industry and infrastructure, family life, city scenes, and landscapes during the first half of the twentieth century. Many photocopies of images exist with annotations by original donor identifying human subjects, their relationships, and their locations.

The series contains 21 subseries.

Ed Aldredge collection

Biographical sketch:
Edgar “Eddie” Wilfrid Aldredge (1901-1992) was one of Penticton’s best known residents. After having worked stints with on the railroad with CPR and in the mining industry with Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company (Trail) in his youth, Aldredge returned to Penticton and began his career as a journalist with the Penticton Herald newspaper in the 1920s. He eventually settled into writing a recurring column dedicated to profiling prominent white settler families of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Later, he wrote a similar column for Okanagan Sunday. He married Winnfred Sadler of Kaleden (d. 1986) in 1963. Ed Aldredge was awarded the City of Penticton’s Merit award for his contributions to the community at in 1973 at the age of 72.

Scope and content:
Subseries consists of 265 photographs taken by Ed Aldredge of notable people, structures, landmarks, and events in Penticton, BC. The subseries consists secondarily of a collection of his published columns in the Penticton Herald and Okanagan Sunday as clippings, mounted in two large scrapbooks.

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