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Archival description
Canadian Women Composers collection
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Ana Sokolović

Series consists of musical scores, handwritten notes and sketches, and a manuscript of the printed first version of Il divertimento barocco (“Baroque Fun” in Italian) 1999 with hand-written edits and other unique manuscript material related to the work’s revision in 2019/2020. The piece was commissioned by the Orchestre baroque de Montréal with funding from Canada Council for the Arts and completed by Sokolovic in 1999, when it was performed at the Salle Pierre-Mercure in Montréal on November 4th. It was originally written for violin, harpsichord, and string ensemble, but has also been performed by baroque flute, violin, viola da gamba, and harpsichord at the Galerie Montcalm in Gatineau, QC in 2012.

Sokolović, Ana

[Athabasca – Prints]

File consists of five large format artist proofs of photographs that were printed during Carruther’s residency at the Banff Centre for the Arts. They measure 29” x 44” (74cm x 112cm) and are comprised of giclée on Epson enhanced matter paper.

[Athabasca Oversize Prints]

Prints depict photographs taken by Carruthers during her research trip to Athabasca Glacier in Alberta on May 23rd, 2017 and subsequently used as inspiration for her composition, slippages.

Barbara Monk Feldman

Series consists of scores, edits, correspondence, and a publication related to two compositions by Barbara Monk Feldman: The Northern Shore for Percussion, Piano and Chamber Orchestra; and, The Pale Blue Northern Sky. The Northern Shore for Percussion, Piano, and Chamber Orchestra is a 2018 revision of Monk Feldman’s 1997 work, The Northern Shore. Whereas the earlier version was written for violin, piano, and percussion, the revision is scored for chamber orchestra. Monk Feldman wrote the piece as an abstracted impression of the colors, textures, and atmospheres evoked by a specific place and time in nature, in particular the Gaspé Peninsula in Quebec where the St. Lawrence River widens into the ocean. Here, the opposite shore appears across the water to Monk Feldman as a sort of mirage that is either enhanced or diminished by the intensity of light on the water during the day. It is this memory of light that Monk Feldman found inspiring, utilizing the way that differing registrations of the violin are sustained in relation to the percussion and piano as an intimation of light and horizon. The Pale Blue Northern Sky was similarly inspired by the same Gaspé location and thus acts a ‘sister piece’ to The Northern Shore. It was written in 2007 for two guitars and a mandolin.

Monk Feldman, Barbara

Canadian Women Composers collection

  • RBSC-ARC-1817
  • Collection
  • 1997 - 2021

Collection consists of primary resources and related materials created and used by Canadian women composers. Each series is dedicated to one of the participating composers, which currently consists of Deborah Carruthers, Dorothy Chang, Zosha Di Castri, Lori Freedman, Barbara Monk Feldman, Ana Sokolović, and Chiyoko Szlavnics. Materials include a variety of records, such as original scores, manuscripts, working drafts, photographs, prints, published articles, correspondence, and materials used as inspiration in the artists' work. Going forward, the collection is expected to evolve and incorporate additional Canadian women composers.

Canadian Women Composers Collection Correspondence [Di Castri]

File consists of a related composition entitled Patina, a musical program, and an essay by Di Castri as well as an agreement, invoice, and various correspondences between her and Kevin Madill, the Head Librarian at UBC’s Music, Art, and Architecture Library, in reference to her contributions to the Canadian Women Composers Collection.

Chiyoko Szlavnics

Series consists of original drawings, scores, handwritten notes and revisions, book/booklets and other materials relating to Szlavnics’ Gradients of Detail. Gradients of Detail was composed by Szlavnics in 2005 especially for Montreal-based string quartet Quatuor Bozzini. Szlavnics compositional process is closely affiliated with her line drawings which became the graphical representation of the score. This visual score was essential to represent the slow sustains and glissandi found throughout this work. The scores are meant to be read from left to right as time (in seconds) and from up to down as the high to low frequency range of pitch, though she cautions against reading this visual representation as exact pitches. These visual artworks must also serve to be art in and of themselves, as that would guarantee that the musical score translated out of it will be strong, according to Szlavnics. She says the forms in Gradients of Detail line drawings are related to the seed pods of the milkweed plant which she drew in Canada in the fall of 2004 just after her father passed away.

Szlavnics, Chiyoko

Composition Inspirational Materials

File consists of materials that served as inspiration to Di Castri during the writing of Sprung Testament, including Beethoven letters and “The Topography of Tears,” a photographic investigation of tears by Rose-Lynn Fisher.

Deborah Carruthers

Series consists of original graphic scores, conductor's score, working templates, notes, art prints, and photographs related to the work ‘slippages’ by Montréal based composer and interdisciplinary artist Deborah Carruthers. In 2017, Carruthers served as the inaugural Artist in Residence at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia (UBC). Deborah teamed up with science researchers at the institution as well as the UBC School of Music to find a way to creatively combine sound, science, and visual art for the purpose of increasing public awareness of the climate crisis. Carruthers conducted field work for the project in the Columbia Icefield along the border of British Columbia and Alberta. Inspired by the threatened glacial landscape, Carruthers returned to her Montréal studio and completed a series of paintings, 27 of which were selected and arranged to produce a graphic score. Graphic scores use visual symbols to represent music rather than traditional music notation. Because of their emphasis on the visual, graphic scores are frequently considered works of art in and of themselves. Moving from sight to sound is accomplished through the creation of a geography of the orchestra on a sheet of transparent plastic which is then used to map over Carruthers’ art works and determine which instruments take responsibility for which parts of the images. ‘Slippages’ premiered Friday, October 5th, 2018, at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts with the UBC Symphony Orchestra under the baton of the symphony’s Director, Dr. Jonathan Girard. Project documentation includes a notebook holding hand-written texts revealing assimilation of glacial theory, inspirational preliminary sketches, and unique inserts; an audio/video recording of the premier; and a copy of a video component to be shown above the orchestra as it performs the work.

Carruthers, Deborah

[Di Castri Photos]

Photographs depict: Di Castri's unique piano preparation for Sprung Testament; Di Castri handing her scores over to Kevin Madill, the Head Librarian of UBC's Music, Art, and Architecture Library, for the purpose of this collection; and a screenshot of Jennifer Koh's show description.

Dorothy Chang

Series consists of final scores, edited scores, notes, and a musical program related to Dorothy Chang’s composition Gateways: Double Concerto for Erhu and Piano. Gateways was commissioned by Nicole Ge Li and Corey Hamm of the Piano-Erhu Project (PEP). Players of the erhu and piano, respectively, they began PEP as a means of exploring the tonal, musical, and cultural blends between two iconic Eastern and Western instruments. For her addition to PEP’s mission, Chang reflected on how she might address the issue of ‘east meets west,’ especially given the solo instruments’ highly distinct and disparate sonic characteristics, performance practices, and musical traditions. Gradually, the piece evolved as a patchwork of musical fragments, moments, and memories gathered from her own multicultural experiences as a first-generation Chinese American, a Western expatriate living in Taiwan, and now an immigrant to Canada. Woven into the three movements are references to a 90’s Chinese pop song, a children’s rhyme, opulent Romanticism, American minimalism, and other influences both subtle and not. The title refers to a Tang Dynasty poem that depicts a gateway as both an opportunity and a barrier, reflecting a deep yearning for a faraway time, place, or memory. The work premiered April 14, 2018 at the VSO Annex Theatre; Ge Li and Hamm served as soloists; William Rowson conducted members of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

Chang, Dorothy

Gateways – Movement 1

File includes initial ideas, concepts, sketches, and a working draft for Movement 1 of Gateways, entitled "a letter to home," along with handwritten edits and notes.

Gateways – Movement 3

File includes planning notes, sketches, and drafts of Movement 3 of Gateways, entitled "games," along with a photocopy of each page and Chang's explanation and timeline of changes.

Gradients of Detail - Canada Council Application

File consists of one page (front and back) for the composer's application for the Canada Council Commissioning Program of the composition of Gradients of Detail for Quatuor Bozzini. The reverse side of the application is written in Croatian with time-stamps and handwritten edits.

Gradients of Detail - Performance with Asasello Quartet CD

File consists of one audio CD and one 19 page (front and back) booklet of Gradients of Detail performed by Asasello Quartet in 2005-2006. The score is the third track on this album and runs for 21:22 minutes. The booklet contains several line drawings by Szlavnics from 2005-2013 and writing by Szlavnics about this visual element to Gradients of Detail.

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