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Uno Langmann Family Collection of B.C. Photographs
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[Walls outside Istanbul]

Caption in album reads, "The walls outside the city showing the old moat which is now used for vegetable gardens. To the right where the cypress trees are is a Turkish cemetery."

[Unknown] (Authorized heading)

[View of street in Istanbul]

Caption in album reads, "Turkey's new womanhood and its flaming youth, parade down the Grand Rue de Pera which abounds with shops and theaters, restaurants, a cabaret and Constantinople's leading hotel."

[Unknown] (Authorized heading)

[Towers at Roumeli Hissar]

Caption in album reads, "The towers at Roumeli Hissar built Mahomed II Fatih (conqueror) just before conquering Constantinople in 1453. Robert College, an American institution is on the hills above. The towers were built in 3 months. The laborers, most of whom were prisoners of war were so overworked that they died by hundreds. Their graves cover the hillsides. It is called the Cemetery of the Martyrs."

[Unknown] (Authorized heading)

[Interior view of The Baghdad Kiosk]

Photograph is numbered 3487. The typed caption in the album reads, "Bagdad Kiosk, to which the Sultan withdraws to rest, when he comes in mid-Ramazan to worship at the Shrine of the Prophet's Cloak, is the next place show to victors. It is said to have been built by Sultan Murad IV. in the style of a Kiosk which he had seen at Bagdad, and which had taken his fancy. Its walls are artistically decorated with blue tiles of the best workmanship, and all the inside of the cupola is covered with deerskin. The inland mother-of-pearl arabesques on the doors, divans, and chairs, are worth seeing. The inlaid silver inscription on the chairs is Padishahim chock Yashah, meaning 'Long life to my Emperor.' Bagdad Kiosk commands a splendid view of the harbour, Galata and Pera."

[Unknown] (Authorized heading)

[Alexander Sarcophagus]

Typed caption in album reads, "The Sarcophagus alleged to be Alexander's.--This sarcophagus was discovered at Saida in 1887 by Hamdi Bey, and is of Pentelic marble; it is 10 feet 8 inches long, 5 feet 7 inches broad, and broken off in excavation, but some of the fragments have been recovered and put together, and the monument is now partially restored; a head, however, and some other fragments are still mission. the repairs to the horse's hoof and to the arm of one of the hunters are ancient. The colouring has faded very much since the monument was unearthed. It is generally called Alexander's sarcophagus, but it has no been possible as yet to decide whose remains it contained. Some aver that it enclosed the corpse of a Persian satrap, who after fighting hard for his country, at last deserted and went over to the Macedonian conqueror, who admitted him to his intimacy. One thing, however, is certain namely, that this, which is one of the most important remaining monuments of Greek antiquity is the work of an artist contemporary with Lysippus, who flourished towards the end of the fourth century B.C. This sarcophagus, which is unique both as regards style and preservation, is modelled to represent an elongated Greek temple, with its friezes, pediments, etc. South side.---The sculptures on this side represent a cavalry engagement between the Greeks and Persians at the battle of Issus, or Arbela. The Greeks are either nude, save for a light chlamys, or else are clad in armour, and wear variously the helmet and the Macedonian cap; while the Persians are dressed in trunk-hose and tunics with a short tight-sleeved cloak hung from the beck down t heir backs. the Greek horses are ridden barebacked with only a bit and bridle, and an occasional breastband; the Persian charges, on the other hand, are richly caparisoned. The figures, at first sight, appear somewhat confusedly arranged, but a closer inspection reveals five distinct and symmetrical groups. The central one is formed of four figures--a Greek horseman; a barbarian kneeling and holding his arms up as if asking quarter; a barbarian archer likewise on his knees; and another towards the left, standing. The two other groups, one on each side of the central one, are each composed of two figures; that on the right represents a hand-to-hand encounter between...".

[Unknown] (Authorized heading)

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